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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All the Caliber wheels appear to be aluminum (including the 18"ers which are actually chrome faced only). The rotors are steel. These are dissimilar metals and WILL effectively weld themselves to each other over time. This is usually not a problem, until you need to fix a flat and find out that you CANNOT get the tire OFF even with all lugs removed. :mad:

I have done this with all my vehicles- with the wheel removed, apply a THIN layer of high temp grease (bearing lube will work) to the face of the rotor, thus creating a barrier between the wheel and rotor, and hence, reducing the rusties/welding.

With my R/T only 3 weeks old, one tire was a bit tough getting off already, and there was a rust mark on the back of one wheel!! The grease will fix that.

I also noticed that the center caps seem to be friction fit into place, and MAY rust away like they did on some PTs. A little squirt of Krown oil spray will help that too.

Here s a pic of the rotor, it shows where the wheel touches the rotor... :eek: It also shows some rust on the edge of the rotor. Maybe some heat paint there might be in order...

 

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Antisieze compound will do the trick. Pretty common problem with spark plugs in aluminum blocks as well.
 

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Sean said:
All the Caliber wheels appear to be aluminum (including the 18"ers which are actually chrome faced only). The rotors are steel. These are dissimilar metals and WILL effectively weld themselves to each other over time.
Yep, aluminum and steel next to each other react and create a current or something and will rust each other very quickly. Not a bright idea to put them together like this. Magnesium alloy would've been the best thing.

Thanks for the tip. Wonder if it'll void the warranty :rolleyes: …just starting a car these days could void it.
 

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GOT said:
Yep, aluminum and steel next to each other react and create a current or something and will rust each other very quickly. Not a bright idea to put them together like this. Magnesium alloy would've been the best thing.
Aren't most factory wheels nowdays aluminum? I know brake rotors are all steel. Never seen a liner between the 2 on any cars I've dealt with. Have you seen this somewhere?

Other than that, steel used in rotors will rust within minutes of getting wet....this is normal. Our brake rotors will go from shiney to rusted in a matter of 30 minutes when washing the cars in our driveway.

J
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jmettee said:
Other than that, steel used in rotors will rust within minutes of getting wet....this is normal. Our brake rotors will go from shiney to rusted in a matter of 30 minutes when washing the cars in our driveway.

J
Yup- usually the cause of particulates in the water- the water evaporates, leaving anything behind. Happens in the rain too. The diff is that this is on the rotor surface, and will be gone after the first braking or so. The crap that I try to avoid is behind the wheel where it contacts the rotor, which is water tight.

A liner- that would be a cool idea! Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm...... :rolleyes:
 

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jmettee said:
Aren't most factory wheels nowdays aluminum?
Not sure. I think some alloy wheels have some other element to slow the corrosion/reaction to steel.
 

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Brake rotors are cast iron, not steel. Steel will warp too easy when getting hot, and expands more when hot plus the constant heating/cooling does weird things to the grain structure of steel. They have never found anything better and as cheap as cast iron. Yes, race cars use carbon fiber rotors, but at several thousand dollars a rotor, you will only see that technology on super exotic street cars like the Ferrari Enzo.

Oh, and under certainconditions magnesium is even MORE galvanic than aluminum, so magnesium wheels are not the answer.
 
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