Dodge Caliber Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, at SEMA every year, my car club is kinda notorious for buying out half of NR>G's booth. We didnt take EVERYTHING this year but we did take about 7-8 things off their hands, one of which was the Electronic Voltage Stabalizer.
Description as found on box and website:
Product Description: Connected to battery terminals, this unit stabilizes power output to all electrical components drawing power from battery. Using an independent power source, this unit boosts battery power when under high loads, thus regulating fluctuations coming from the battery that can result in loss of power or responsiveness from ignition system components. Can also improve interior lighting as well as stereo equipment performance.




Benefits:
Increase Torque
Improve Fuel Economy
Car Response Up
Stable Idling
Quick Engine Start
Lesser Engine Noise
Optimize Electronic Equipment Performance

This product also has a built in electronic noise filter.


What ive noticed most thus far after installing it on the caliber is. the idle is a little more calm, and the cars innitial pickup off the line is better, the throttle response has increased slightly. Also i get less dimming on the headlights when ive got all my "gadgets" running at one time. When i get the car dynod at some point i plan to dyno it with this hooked up and unhooked also to see any number changes.

On the box it comes with a dyno sheet of a car they dynod in 04. it shows a smoother acceleration in the powerband, and an increase of 7hp.
Took 5 seconds to install and seems to work pretty well... Image shown is there older, larger model. I got the new one that came out his year... the EPAC3. smaller, compact size for easier placement in the engine bay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
Simply based on the science behind it (maintaining a constant 12v flow) I do not see how any of the purported benefits could possibly occur.

The only benefit I could see from it is the noise filter. And that would only come into play with alternator noise coming through your speakers, which in the caliber I haven't heard any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Hope you didn't pay more than 5 or 10 bucks for it.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
I never know what to think about these electical things... although on my Matrix XRS i did have a short once and it really killed the power so I do believe in the benefits of a good current but i am not sure that ground wires etc. really do improve things that much over the stock system
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Amandyke said:
Simply based on the science behind it (maintaining a constant 12v flow) I do not see how any of the purported benefits could possibly occur.

The only benefit I could see from it is the noise filter. And that would only come into play with alternator noise coming through your speakers, which in the caliber I haven't heard any.
IMO what you said really makes no sence... if you can keep something at a constant 12v, which strong batteries actaully will read HIGHER then 12v, anything power operated will run better with a constant current. Anyone who has a had a stereo or any sort of electronic gadgets knows that often times the lights dim when the bass hits, or when you roll the windows up your lights will dim out etc... that power has to come from somewhere and when your using more power for something else its drawing it from somewhere that may need it. (ie vehicle performance, ecu, our independant coil packs etc...)

whether you "think" its mickey mouse or not, i actually notice the difference and thats all that matters.
From what ive read up on it though, its not good to run these with a deap cycle battery. The unit runs your battery harder and it takes longer to recharge a deap cycle, so the chances of it dying are a lot greater.

Parts MSRP is 149.00 .... usually see them go for around here for $100ish
i paid well below dealer cost (which i do most stuff, at SEMA especially) $30.00
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
Gotta love the seat of the pants effect huh. Better known at the placebo effect.

That little gadget is simply redundant. Your battery should be capable of doing exactly what the device claims to do. If it's incapable, it's a sign that your battery is going.

As for your "when the bass hits" statement, Sure, when you're drawing 800 watts all of a sudden it can dim your headlights. But it wont effect your engine.

Also, stop and think about our first sentence. If what I said in my first post makes no sense to you... Well then you don't quite understand how the electircal system in your car works. Sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
What is the minimum voltage needed to keep the spark at its needed performance? Back in the day when they used coils, a fluctuation in input voltage can effect the high voltage output to the spark plug a lot, but now that it is all electronic, is there a regulator that will function at 11 volts? The typical "12 volt" system is actually rated at 13.8-14.4, when you draw a lot of current the voltage will sag, this is why for sub-woofer amplifiers they install multi fared capacitors to provide a huge amount of current for a short perioud of time to keep it up to the 13.8 Volts. Now that the calibers plugs are fired from an electronic device above the plug it may have a higher tollerance to voltage sags. Anyone know what the tollerances are?

Other than that it should not impact the cars performace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
^^ good question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Riddle me this then. When you role up your windows at night with the headlights on, why would the lights dim if everything is working the way its suppose to... theres nothing wrong with the battery, its done it since ive bought the car, and dont it on many other cars ive owned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Sounds like its not much more than a cap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Darren07RT said:
Riddle me this then. When you role up your windows at night with the headlights on, why would the lights dim if everything is working the way its suppose to... theres nothing wrong with the battery, its done it since ive bought the car, and dont it on many other cars ive owned.
This is typical of not having enough supply to feed all the components at maximum voltage. Typical automotive components are rated at 13.8-14.4 VDC. If your system is runnning at 14V and you apply a load, it may sag to 13.5 or even 12.5. You will see this as a decrease in brighness in the lights, or hear it in the decreased sound in the power window motor. When a high current device draws current through a wire, the wire will cause loss. To compensate for this it is necessary to overspec the wire and install somethign much larger than is needed. Most companies do not do this. The other thing is when you are drawing a large load the system will sag. To compensate one needs a larger capacity battery, and alternator. Also realize if the 12V system is sagging from 13.9 to 13.2 it is within spec, but you will see the lights dim. This is a case where a high power regulator that hold the voltage at a constant 13.8 would help, but if the power wires are not over rated, then you will still have a voltage drop at the high current device (Power windows, etc.) because the power cables are loosing some. In this case the lights will stay bright at a constant 13.8 as well as the feed to the spark plugs will stay a constant 13.8, but the power window will sag a little.
In all reality this typically is not a problem, it does worsen when the car is at itle because the alternator is running slower and cannot produce the needed power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
Aaahhhh... Thank you Fingernipp (what a weird name, but to each there own). All this device does is store a small charge to use when there is alot of load on the electric system. Hence a CAP!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
caliber172 said:
This is typical of not having enough supply to feed all the components at maximum voltage. Typical automotive components are rated at 13.8-14.4 VDC. If your system is runnning at 14V and you apply a load, it may sag to 13.5 or even 12.5. You will see this as a decrease in brighness in the lights, or hear it in the decreased sound in the power window motor. When a high current device draws current through a wire, the wire will cause loss. To compensate for this it is necessary to overspec the wire and install somethign much larger than is needed. Most companies do not do this. The other thing is when you are drawing a large load the system will sag. To compensate one needs a larger capacity battery, and alternator. Also realize if the 12V system is sagging from 13.9 to 13.2 it is within spec, but you will see the lights dim. This is a case where a high power regulator that hold the voltage at a constant 13.8 would help, but if the power wires are not over rated, then you will still have a voltage drop at the high current device (Power windows, etc.) because the power cables are loosing some. In this case the lights will stay bright at a constant 13.8 as well as the feed to the spark plugs will stay a constant 13.8, but the power window will sag a little.
In all reality this typically is not a problem, it does worsen when the car is at itle because the alternator is running slower and cannot produce the needed power.
Very well written, but I disagree with your assertion that there is a voltage drop caused by the wiring. With the short physical length of the wire runs in an automobile, and the wire gauges used, there is little chance of a "drop". I'm sure the engineers designed the system using the proper wire gauge to handle, or even "over-handle" (yes, I made up a word!) the expected current draw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
black-sxt-sport said:
Aaahhhh... Thank you Fingernipp (what a weird name, but to each there own). All this device does is store a small charge to use when there is alot of load on the electric system. Hence a CAP!!!
A cap will dump a lot of current into the power system when it sags, but it cannot completely stabalize the voltage over a perioud of time. This electronic device appears to be more like a regulator. Many high quality ups's that are used for comptuers on 110v ac can also regulate the voltage. They can increase and decrease the voltage. If you feed it with a brown out at 85VAC they will put out 110v ac. If you feed it with 135 VAC they will put out 110v ac. It looks like this device will regulate the voltage in the same way, so within a reasonable amount of current it will keep the voltage up to what it is set for even if the system drops to 11VDC. A cap cannot do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
MikeinWoodstock said:
Very well written, but I disagree with your assertion that there is a voltage drop caused by the wiring. With the short physical length of the wire runs in an automobile, and the wire gauges used, there is little chance of a "drop". I'm sure the engineers designed the system using the proper wire gauge to handle, or even "over-handle" (yes, I made up a word!) the expected current draw.
Any wire will cause a slight drop in voltage. There is no such thing as a zero resistance wire, and any resistance will cause a voltage drop. Now when speaking about affect on our vehicles electrical system, it is such a small voltage drop that it's not even worth mentioning. But, upgrading the ground wire size and number of ground wires going to the frame from the motor/battery, will increase electrical performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
caliber172 said:
A cap will dump a lot of current into the power system when it sags, but it cannot completely stabalize the voltage over a perioud of time. This electronic device appears to be more like a regulator. Many high quality ups's that are used for comptuers on 110v ac can also regulate the voltage. They can increase and decrease the voltage. If you feed it with a brown out at 85VAC they will put out 110v ac. If you feed it with 135 VAC they will put out 110v ac. It looks like this device will regulate the voltage in the same way, so within a reasonable amount of current it will keep the voltage up to what it is set for even if the system drops to 11VDC. A cap cannot do that.
well written... sounds quite a bit more accurate then just calling it a cap... i woulda said the same thing but i lack the technical lingo :) lol
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
696 Posts
caliber172 said:
What is the minimum voltage needed to keep the spark at its needed performance? Back in the day when they used coils, a fluctuation in input voltage can effect the high voltage output to the spark plug a lot, but now that it is all electronic, is there a regulator that will function at 11 volts? The typical "12 volt" system is actually rated at 13.8-14.4, when you draw a lot of current the voltage will sag, this is why for sub-woofer amplifiers they install multi fared capacitors to provide a huge amount of current for a short perioud of time to keep it up to the 13.8 Volts. Now that the calibers plugs are fired from an electronic device above the plug it may have a higher tollerance to voltage sags. Anyone know what the tollerances are?

Other than that it should not impact the cars performace.
You are correct in what you have said. Just like the other poster stated that the windows will "draw" addtional voltage off the system when you have your lights on. It is simply a resistor/capacitor that keeps the current consistant when its in high demand. There have been proven results on some cars that these will add HP on the dyno, but they have all been cars that are older. Now I am not sure how well the Calibers wiring is but if its anything like the neons then one of these as well as a grounding kit couldnt hurt. We had a grounding kit and something similar to this on another car and the guy wanted to dyno after the install of them to see if he gained anything, 10HP and 12TQ were the gains. Now after the dyno I had a chance to drive it and I must say that it seemed to idle a little better and drive a little smoother after the install/dyno. I had driven his car after every install/mod and I noticed a difference. Not what I feel are the biggest gains in a mod like this is the power supply to the fuel pump. Fuel pumps are a consistant draw and draw even more when you go WOT, so keeping the current stable is always a good thing, at least for the fuel pump.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top