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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If anyone's interested, the FilterMag SS-300 is a reasonable fit to the Caliber's oil filter. I just picked one up on eBay for $25 + shipping.

For those who don't know, the FilterMag is a curved high-power magnet that you stick to the side of your oil filter. It uses neodymium ("rare earth") magnets that are orders of magnitude stronger than your average refrigerator magnets. With the FilterMag in place, microscopic metal shavings from your engine are trapped in the filter. (The filter won't grab anything smaller than about 20-25 microns; the FilterMag's pull will hold on to filings as small as 2 microns.)

I last bought one of these for my mother's Town Car. She had 120,000+ miles on the engine and never had a teardown, rebuild, or oil problem to speak of. I credit the FilterMag for contributing to that longevity.

Sorry if this sounds like a commercial. :)
 

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This is great. Thank you for the info. Got mine ready so when the car is delivered I can install it.
 

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Someone posted a while back they were going to cut open their oil filter after using the Filtermag on their car to see what it does. Personally, i consider it snake oil. Most of the metal used in the engines of our cars is non-magnetic like aluminum from the pistons, heads and block. For comparison, I had 120K on my '99 Dakota R/T which was raced at least twice a month at a drag strip, frequent trips over 120mph, and always WOT acceleration up to the speed limit during my "normal" driving. I used Mobil1 oil and either mobil1 or K&N filters, and when I tore the motor down after I totaled the truck in a wreck, it still looked new internally. had the factory hone marks on the cylinder walls, all bearing looked good, and when the block was magnafluxed before the rebuild, it got a clean bill of health and didn't even need bored out. All of this without a filtermag on a high performance modified, and frequently raced V-8 motor. I highly doubt the little 4cyl in our cars used for daily driving would have a need for this.

If anyone can offer any evidence to the contrary, I will retract my post. Otherwise, i say save your money for gas.
 

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Good point, forgot about all about the aluminum. Worst case is a waste of money. I will post images of the cut away filters, currently it is in D1 status.
 

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I know we touched on this before. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that all internal moving parts, and the cylinder walls(including the piston rings) are made out of steel(which will and do break down!). And yes it may be true that huge chunks of these parts are not flying around causing damage........(at least we hope)......and we do realize the filter will trap most of the contaminents. But what we hopefuls are considering, is that the filter-mag provides that small added protection that just possibly the filter is not getting. So in conclusion.....whether you believe it or not, It's really up to you to decide if you want to use it or not................I do! I figured it's not going to hurt my engine, just put a small dent in my wallet if it does nothing else:D.
 

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Added protection from what? People have been driving for years without this device on thier vehciles and doing just fine.

The problem we have, is there is no way to say for sure if the filtermag is actually helping any or not. With the way the oil flows through the filter, of course there is going to be some particles stuck to the outside by the filtermag, but there is no way to say for sure if those same particles would or wouldn't have been filtered out by the filter media since they are stuck to the outside.

My only take on this, is people have been running engines for years without it and had no problems. So why now is it a big concern to all of a sudden have to start using it? The biggest isse I could see in not using it, is the oil filter woudl clog up sonner, but if you practice regular oil changes, this shoudl never be a problem unless there is something seriously wrong with your vehicle. I say save your money for other stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
HSKR said:
Most of the metal used in the engines of our cars is non-magnetic like aluminum from the pistons, heads and block.
This is the root of your misconception.

Yes, there's a fair amount of aluminum in there. But many engines have aluminum engines with steel cylinder sleeves, which do wear. And let's also not forget about things like bearings and rings which can be magnetic and do wear down. And what about the oil and water pumps? They have moving steel parts in them. Valve guides, valves, valve seats, rocker arms, camshafts...these are all friction-surfaced steel components that shed metal.

I've had two oil changes on my Caliber with the FilterMag in place, and I cut open both filters and found a decent amount of metal in there. You may consider it snake oil but reality tells a different story.

HSKR said:
Added protection from what? People have been driving for years without this device on thier vehciles and doing just fine.
Oil filters can't trap everything. It's added protection from those metal particulates that pass through the oil filter.

The "doing just fine" comment really makes me ponder your credibility. People have been driving for years with mineral-based motor oils and were doing just fine, so why switch to synthetics? People had been driving for years with a mechanically-advanced points-based ignition system and were doing just fine, so why switch to an electronic system? People had been driving for years with lap belts (and prior to that, no seat belts at all) and were doing just fine, so why switch to three-point belts and airbags?

Just because something was "doing just fine" before doesn't mean that it can't be improved upon. That's the whole point of the FilterMag; it improves the filtering capabilities of your oil filter by effectively magnetizing it. Sure, you can run your car without it and do just fine. But since it DOES perform as advertised -- it DOES remove metal from the oil which would not have been caught by the filter -- why not have that bit of added protection? If you are comfortable with knowing that there are microscopic bits of metal in your oiling system that are not in mine and you don't believe in the effectiveness of the actual demonstrable physics of the FilterMag, then don't buy one. For those of us who feel that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, we've got FilterMags.
 

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sgodun said:
The "doing just fine" comment really makes me ponder your credibility. People have been driving for years with mineral-based motor oils and were doing just fine, so why switch to synthetics? People had been driving for years with a mechanically-advanced points-based ignition system and were doing just fine, so why switch to an electronic system? People had been driving for years with lap belts (and prior to that, no seat belts at all) and were doing just fine, so why switch to three-point belts and airbags?
Synthetic oils and ignitions systems were performance increases that not only made the cars perform better, but also have decreased emissions. Seatbelts and airbags were federally mandated for safety reasons, otherwise I'm sure you'd still see cars being made with out them. Or just available options. This filtermag doesn't increase performance or safety in any way.

Just because something was "doing just fine" before doesn't mean that it can't be improved upon. That's the whole point of the FilterMag; it improves the filtering capabilities of your oil filter by effectively magnetizing it. Sure, you can run your car without it and do just fine. But since it DOES perform as advertised -- it DOES remove metal from the oil which would not have been caught by the filter -- why not have that bit of added protection? If you are comfortable with knowing that there are microscopic bits of metal in your oiling system that are not in mine and you don't believe in the effectiveness of the actual demonstrable physics of the FilterMag, then don't buy one. For those of us who feel that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, we've got FilterMags.
Can you prove the metal trapped against the side of the filter by the filter mag would NOT have been trapped by the filter itself?? No you can't. Oil filters are designed to filter out any materials that could be damaging to your motor. If it's not filtering out those damaging materials, then you need to change filters. If this filtermag was such a huge improvement for longetivity of the motor, then there would be a whole lot more people suing them, and probably be built into oil filters, or pre-installed from the factory. IMO, it's not different than the "fuel saver" magnets you can buy for your fuel line.
 

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Ran a 10-bay service center for 4 years, did tons of oil changes. Thousands of cars of all years, makes and models and engines that used an aftermarket magnetic point oil drain plug and not one had a single metal flake on it in 4 years of service.

Does it make it pointless? No, it can be an identifier, a red flag, for a coming, much larger problem. However around the oil filter...

It can have some merit, but I view it as a bandaid solution for a gunshot wound. Anyone that has done automotive repair across the decades has probably noticed a trend, oil filters have gotten alot smaller and car manufacturer's are recommending longer oil change intervals and those two factors just don't go together. Due to packaging constraints and to avoid wasted money in R&D, today's engines have adopted tiny oil filters and it's not because they are superior to their 1-qt brethren of the 1970s. So instead of designing a drivetrain arrangement or control arm design to fit a particular oil filter or to move the oil filter to a remote location, they just go with what fits. Classic case even the most un-auto-savvy consumers notice is on the modern Hemi, a L14670 Purolator is the part number IIRC, which the oil filter for this 7-qt monster V8 is about 2" tall and 3" wide. So you are telling me an oil filter with media that is only 1.5" tall can successfully strain out all bad particles and foreign objects from a large displacement, high performance V8 for 5,000 miles? A magnetic wrap around the filter won't help that situation any.

The above is why when I came to find a solution for my Mazda in the oil filtration department (Again supplied with a tiny filter), I found an industrial equipment oil filter that worked perfectly. It was about 7.5" tall and about 4" in diameter and more importantly was it's bypass valve pressure. Once an oil filter reaches a certain pressure, it closes off the oil filter so lubrication can be maintained. The industrial oil filter had a very high BVP (Around 19 to 21 PSI IIRC, for reference, a top end K&N's is around 14 PSI and your more typically off the shelf filters are 8 to 12 PSI). So not only did it have a ton more media to absorb anything nasty and unneeded, it wouldn't close off the oil filter and allow contaminated oil to lubricate the engine that could potentially cause accelerated wear or engine failure.
 

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CoolCallie said:
The above is why when I came to find a solution for my Mazda in the oil filtration department (Again supplied with a tiny filter), I found an industrial equipment oil filter that worked perfectly. It was about 7.5" tall and about 4" in diameter and more importantly was it's bypass valve pressure. Once an oil filter reaches a certain pressure, it closes off the oil filter so lubrication can be maintained. The industrial oil filter had a very high BVP (Around 19 to 21 PSI IIRC, for reference, a top end K&N's is around 14 PSI and your more typically off the shelf filters are 8 to 12 PSI). So not only did it have a ton more media to absorb anything nasty and unneeded, it wouldn't close off the oil filter and allow contaminated oil to lubricate the engine that could potentially cause accelerated wear or engine failure.
Only problem with the higher bpypass valve pressure of the oil filter you are using is it will allow oil starvation as the pressure on the back side of the filter won't be as high as in front of the filter. Not sure of the flow path in your car, but if the oil gets filters before going into the motor, then if the filter is starting to get clogged, but not yet to the bypass valve pressure, the the oil pressure on the output of the filter will be lower than in input side, and could lead to oil not having enough pressure to reach everywhere it needs to at higher RPMs.
 

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HSKR said:
Only problem with the higher bpypass valve pressure of the oil filter you are using is it will allow oil starvation as the pressure on the back side of the filter won't be as high as in front of the filter. Not sure of the flow path in your car, but if the oil gets filters before going into the motor, then if the filter is starting to get clogged, but not yet to the bypass valve pressure, the the oil pressure on the output of the filter will be lower than in input side, and could lead to oil not having enough pressure to reach everywhere it needs to at higher RPMs.
Some car manufacturer's install a bypass valve in the oil filter housing, with that being the case, an oil filter with a high pressure just prevents the oil filter from being closed off before the car manufacturer wants it to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
HSKR said:
Synthetic oils and ignitions systems were performance increases that not only made the cars perform better, but also have decreased emissions. Seatbelts and airbags were federally mandated for safety reasons, otherwise I'm sure you'd still see cars being made with out them. Or just available options. This filtermag doesn't increase performance or safety in any way.
Nor has anyone made such a claim, so I'm not sure what your point is.

HSKR said:
Can you prove the metal trapped against the side of the filter by the filter mag would NOT have been trapped by the filter itself?? No you can't.
Not without an electron microscope or a really small ruler. But I can go by known physics and some logical presumptions. Oil filters will only remove particulates down to a certain size. Anything smaller than that size, the filter will let pass through. Most oil filters won't remove anything smaller than about 25 microns at most. So can YOU prove that engines only shed metal fragments that are 25 microns or larger? No, you can't.

I believe it is not unreasonable that sub-25 micron particles are shed by engine components, and therefore would be missed by even the best oil filters. The Filtermag catches those.

HSKR said:
Oil filters are designed to filter out any materials that could be damaging to your motor. If it's not filtering out those damaging materials, then you need to change filters.
Aha, there's the fundamental flaw in your logic. This is a false, or at least misleading, statement. More accurately: Oil filters are designed to filter out any materials that are large enough to pass through the filter medium without adversely affecting oil flow through the engine. It is possible to engineer a filter that can trap much smaller particles. But by the time you do that you'd have created such a fine mesh that the oil itself wouldn't be able to pass through the filter quickly enough to return to the engine, and you'd get catastrophic failure. So, yeah, you can change the filter and capture particles that the Filtermag would catch, but you'd starve the engine for oil trying to do it.

HSKR said:
If this filtermag was such a huge improvement for longetivity of the motor, then there would be a whole lot more people suing them, and probably be built into oil filters, or pre-installed from the factory.
Flawed logic. Similarly, there are aftermarket air filters which perform better than factory air filters, so why aren't a whole lot more people using them or having them pre-installed from the factory? If you can answer that, then you can answer your own question.

HSKR said:
IMO, it's not different than the "fuel saver" magnets you can buy for your fuel line.
Then you clearly haven't been paying much attention. Those "fuel saver" magnets claim to do things like 'magnetically realign the molecules in your fuel to evoke a more efficient burn' or some **** like that. No real physics at all, just some fancy-sounding words.

Filtermag says, "this will trap particles that your oil filter cannot trap, because ferrous metal is attracted to the magnet no matter how small the particle." This isn't just words, this is bone-stark truth.

Again: If you don't want to believe it then you don't have to. But so far you've done little more than ignore the physical reality of the product and grouped it in with obvious snake oil. I don't know why, maybe one too many late-night informercials for you, but you really can't simply dismiss reality:

Oil filters won't catch anything that's smaller than the filter medium is designed to catch.

Engines can and will shed iron that's smaller than the oil filter medium can catch.

The Filtermag (or ANY strong magnet, for that matter) will attract those ferrous particles that the filter won't catch, thus keeping them out of your engine.
 

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sgodun said:
Nor has anyone made such a claim, so I'm not sure what your point is.
My point was trying to figure out why you brought seatbelts and airbags into a conversation about oil filters.

Not without an electron microscope or a really small ruler. But I can go by known physics and some logical presumptions. Oil filters will only remove particulates down to a certain size. Anything smaller than that size, the filter will let pass through. Most oil filters won't remove anything smaller than about 25 microns at most. So can YOU prove that engines only shed metal fragments that are 25 microns or larger? No, you can't.
Never said they didn't. Merely said the filters were designed to filter out particles that could damage the motor. Can you prove that even at 25 microns those particles are damaging to your motor??

I believe it is not unreasonable that sub-25 micron particles are shed by engine components, and therefore would be missed by even the best oil filters. The Filtermag catches those.

Aha, there's the fundamental flaw in your logic. This is a false, or at least misleading, statement. More accurately: Oil filters are designed to filter out any materials that are large enough to pass through the filter medium without adversely affecting oil flow through the engine. It is possible to engineer a filter that can trap much smaller particles. But by the time you do that you'd have created such a fine mesh that the oil itself wouldn't be able to pass through the filter quickly enough to return to the engine, and you'd get catastrophic failure. So, yeah, you can change the filter and capture particles that the Filtermag would catch, but you'd starve the engine for oil trying to do it.
Yes, the filter will only filter out the material that is too large to pass through the medium, but do you really think that oil filter companies could get away with making oil filters that can't filter out damaging particles?? They sure as hell wouldn't be in business very long if they let stuff like that pass through and shorten engine life. How long do you plan on keeping your car?? There are cars on the road today with over 300 thousand miles that are still running good without the "benifit" of a filtermag installed. Most people never get thier vehicles over 100K iles before they sell it. But then again, I gues if you plan on neglecting your car by not performing regular oil changes, then maybe the filtermag will make a difference.

Flawed logic. Similarly, there are aftermarket air filters which perform better than factory air filters, so why aren't a whole lot more people using them or having them pre-installed from the factory? If you can answer that, then you can answer your own question.
The filters installed from the factory are made to allow the vehicle to pass federal emissions, filter out most of the dirt in the air, and fit in the location the engineers decided to put it. The aftermarket air filters that perform better don't filter as good as the factory filters do so decrease engine life. Sure, they could re-tune the computer to pass the emissions standards with the high performance filters, but at what cost to the manufacturer? Sounds to me like you don't know as much as you are trying to put on.

Then you clearly haven't been paying much attention. Those "fuel saver" magnets claim to do things like 'magnetically realign the molecules in your fuel to evoke a more efficient burn' or some **** like that. No real physics at all, just some fancy-sounding words.

Filtermag says, "this will trap particles that your oil filter cannot trap, because ferrous metal is attracted to the magnet no matter how small the particle." This isn't just words, this is bone-stark truth.
No, I have been paying attention. The fuel saver makes claims that it can't support, much like the filtermag. Sure it meets the claims of trapping particles against the side of the filter. But you still haven't showed that it isn't just trapping particles that the filter would have filtered anyways. And the more particles trapped in the filter, the better job it does at filtering. So technically, you are decreasing the eficiency of the filter by keeping the larger particles from filling the holes in the filter. Also, you have no proff, and neither does Filtermag that the particles it traps that may have gotten through the filter are damaging to the motor.

Again: If you don't want to believe it then you don't have to. But so far you've done little more than ignore the physical reality of the product and grouped it in with obvious snake oil. I don't know why, maybe one too many late-night informercials for you, but you really can't simply dismiss reality:
And you've done nothing to provide any evidence that the money spent on the filtermag will actually benifit the motor in any way.

Oil filters won't catch anything that's smaller than the filter medium is designed to catch.
True

Engines can and will shed iron that's smaller than the oil filter medium can catch.
True, but how much potential danger do those particles pose to the motor???

The Filtermag (or ANY strong magnet, for that matter) will attract those ferrous particles that the filter won't catch, thus keeping them out of your engine.
Don't forget that it also traps the larger particles that would normally get caught in the filter media making it more efficient at filtering as the holes get filled in. When combined with regular maintenance and oil changes, even without the magical filtermag, your motor will last as long as you own your vehicle. That is unless you abuse your car, then nothing is going to help it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
HSKR said:
Never said they didn't. Merely said the filters were designed to filter out particles that could damage the motor. Can you prove that even at 25 microns those particles are damaging to your motor??
Can you prove that they don't? Is it not fair to assume that ANY metal in the oil would be damaging to the engine to some degree, and that degree may be so gradual (but effective) that it could mean the difference between a 120k mile engine and a 180k mile engine?

HSKR said:
Yes, the filter will only filter out the material that is too large to pass through the medium, but do you really think that oil filter companies could get away with making oil filters that can't filter out damaging particles?? They sure as hell wouldn't be in business very long if they let stuff like that pass through and shorten engine life.
It's not a matter of "getting away" with anything. It is physically impossible to engineer a filter that will remove such small particles without adversely restricting the oil flow to the extent that oil starvation would damage the engine. It's not like the engineers are asking themselves, "Do you think we can get away with a filter that only removes particles that are 30 microns and larger?" No, they're saying, "If we make our filter any more efficient at removing the smaller particles then the filter will starve the engine for oil." That's not "getting away" with anything. That's acknowledging physical laws.

HSKR said:
How long do you plan on keeping your car?? There are cars on the road today with over 300 thousand miles that are still running good without the "benifit" of a filtermag installed. Most people never get thier vehicles over 100K iles before they sell it. But then again, I gues if you plan on neglecting your car by not performing regular oil changes, then maybe the filtermag will make a difference.
It's interesting how you revert to sideways accusations like this. Regardless: I don't know how long I plan on keeping my car. But if I keep it for 100k miles, I'd be willing to bet that my engine will have less wear on it than a comparable car with 100k miles that didn't have the Filtermag. Yeah, there are cars that run over 300k miles without the Filtermag -- and again, if you compared one of those cars to one with similar mileage that DID have the Filtermag (assuming all else were equal) I'd bet that the Filtermag-equipped vehicle would show less wear, and would therefore last longer.

HSKR said:
The filters installed from the factory are made to allow the vehicle to pass federal emissions, filter out most of the dirt in the air, and fit in the location the engineers decided to put it.
Not necessarily in that order, but otherwise true.

HSKR said:
The aftermarket air filters that perform better don't filter as good as the factory filters do so decrease engine life. Sure, they could re-tune the computer to pass the emissions standards with the high performance filters, but at what cost to the manufacturer? Sounds to me like you don't know as much as you are trying to put on.
More sideways accusations. Why are you taking this so personally?

There are aftermarket air filters which perform better than OEM filters.

HSKR said:
No, I have been paying attention. The fuel saver makes claims that it can't support, much like the filtermag.
Untrue. There's a difference between "can't support" and "don't agree with". The claim that a magnet can change the molecular structure of fuel cannot be supported. The claim that Filtermag can remove metal that the filter cannot touch can absolutely be supported. You simply don't agree, contrary to physical evidence.

HSKR said:
Sure it meets the claims of trapping particles against the side of the filter. But you still haven't showed that it isn't just trapping particles that the filter would have filtered anyways.
I must have left my electron microscope in my other jacket.

Seriously, did you actually read what I wrote in my previous response? Because I already addressed this.

HSKR said:
And the more particles trapped in the filter, the better job it does at filtering. So technically, you are decreasing the eficiency of the filter by keeping the larger particles from filling the holes in the filter.
This is so wrong that for a moment I thought that someone else had typed it and I had to go back and check. What in the world makes you think that a (partially) clogged filter makes it more efficient? I suppose the argument could be said that the now-smaller holes will trap smaller particles, but that also means that there's less volume coming through the filter. This is not doing "a better job". It's just reducing the available clean oil (air, etc).

Haven't you ever had a vacuum cleaner with a dirty filter or a full bag? Are you telling me that your dirty vacuum cleaner does a better job than a clean one?

HSKR said:
Also, you have no proff, and neither does Filtermag that the particles it traps that may have gotten through the filter are damaging to the motor.
And you have no proof that such particles aren't damaging. I believe it is a rational and fair assumption, based on sheer physics, that ANY metal in the oil would be damaging to the engine to some degree and removing that metal would improve the longevity of the machine.

HSKR said:
And you've done nothing to provide any evidence that the money spent on the filtermag will actually benifit the motor in any way.
Actually I have; see the paragraph that I just wrote, as well as the opening paragraph to this response. You simply choose to disagree with it.

HSKR said:
True, but how much potential danger do those particles pose to the motor???
Potentially a huge amount, since I consider ANY metal in the oil to be harmful. Given how adamant you are about this point I am guessing that you consider a certain amount of metal in the oil to be harmless.

HSKR said:
Don't forget that it also traps the larger particles that would normally get caught in the filter media making it more efficient at filtering as the holes get filled in.
Already addressed; your logic is flawed. See above.

HSKR said:
When combined with regular maintenance and oil changes, even without the magical filtermag, your motor will last as long as you own your vehicle. That is unless you abuse your car, then nothing is going to help it.
"Magical" filtering? So... You consider the magnetic attraction of ferrous material to be a "magical" event?

HSKR, you're bound and determined to believe that you're right even in the face of some overwhelming physical evidence. You keep calling it things like "magical" and "unfounded" even though the principles that it operates on are completely real and demonstrable. If you want to deny actual, credible, real, demonstrable physical reality and put it in the same category as molecule-changing snake oil, well, I think that about says it all about your belief structure, and I'm afraid I just can't discuss things like this with someone who is so adamant that the world is flat.

So, there ya go: You're right. The Filtermag doesn't work. It doesn't attract any metal that wouldn't get caught by the filter. It doesn't remove metal from the oil. Metal in the oil doesn't harm the vehicle in any measurable way. And there's no way that any aftermarket product could conceivably do anything better than anything produced by the factory. I am hereby convinced of all the wisdom that you have shared with us, and I will therefore take my magic vehicle and drive it off into the sunset.

Or at least to the edge of the world, since I wouldn't want to drive off the edge.
 

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sgodun said:
So, there ya go: You're right. The Filtermag doesn't work. It doesn't attract any metal that wouldn't get caught by the filter. It doesn't remove metal from the oil. Metal in the oil doesn't harm the vehicle in any measurable way. And there's no way that any aftermarket product could conceivably do anything better than anything produced by the factory. I am hereby convinced of all the wisdom that you have shared with us, and I will therefore take my magic vehicle and drive it off into the sunset.

Or at least to the edge of the world, since I wouldn't want to drive off the edge.
It's blanket statements like that, that companies use to market thier products to make people think they "need" to have the product. Your statements above are so broad in an attempt to be overly sarcastic that they aren't even valid in this discussion. Which also means you are getting frustrated because you, as well, are so bound and determined that you are right you won't accept any other opinion. There is no physical or laboratory proof anywhere to back up the claims made about extending the life of the motor. And while I have none to support my opinion either, that doesn't make it false. It just makes it different. But you can't argue with the fact that there are still cars made from several decades ago with large amounts of mileage on them running just fine even without this so called benifit the filtermag gives you. By your theory, the motors should have died long ago because of all the extra metal in them. And they didn't even have filters as advanced as we use today back when they were first driven.

As for your comparisons between an oil filter and a vacuum cleaner. Not sure about you, but I change/clean both of them often enough that they don't get clogged enough to the point of causing damage. Oil filters aren't designed to be ran forever, which is why you should change them when you chaneg the oil at least. If you are that worried about it, then you should be doing oil analysis to ensure that the level of metals in your oil meet your satisfaction.
 

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Give it a rest HSKR, it ins't like anyone is wasting a huge amount of money if they buy it.....the darn thing is $29.95. Over the liftime of the vehicle it costs only pennies per oil change to have it on......no big deal. I don't see people nagging on about Zaino, and if it's scientifically proven to work. I'll try and cut my filter in half next oil change, if there is no evidence that is does anything you win. But for now, this is enough debate on whether is works or not, it's getting quite tiresome, and quite possibly you can never be swayed either way.
 

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EXcaliber said:
I'll try and cut my filter in half next oil change, if there is no evidence that is does anything you win. But for now, this is enough debate on whether is works or not, it's getting quite tiresome, and quite possibly you can never be swayed either way.
I've never said it doesn't attract anything to the magnet. I'm sure it does, so cutting open a filter isn't going to prove anything other than a magnet attracts ferrous metals. My opinion is that what it does trap would either a) have been trapped by the filter anyways or b) not be big enough to do any damage to the motor to even need to be trapped.
 

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HSKR said:
Added protection from what? People have been driving for years without this device on thier vehciles and doing just fine.

What is your definition of doing just fine? Is a engine that lasts 150k miles just fine? What if someone else found the true life of that identical engie was 350k miles? One can argue that 100 years ago when people did not live as long they were doing just fine, and now people live in their 70's Is living to your 50's just fine? It was to them. I say every production engine should last for 300k miles.

Using just find does not fit, because I am fat and out of shape and I do just fine, but in reality I could do a LOT better.

The problem we have, is there is no way to say for sure if the filtermag is actually helping any or not. With the way the oil flows through the filter, of course there is going to be some particles stuck to the outside by the filtermag, but there is no way to say for sure if those same particles would or wouldn't have been filtered out by the filter media since they are stuck to the outside.

My only take on this, is people have been running engines for years without it and had no problems. So why now is it a big concern to all of a sudden have to start using it? The biggest isse I could see in not using it, is the oil filter woudl clog up sonner, but if you practice regular oil changes, this shoudl never be a problem unless there is something seriously wrong with your vehicle. I say save your money for other stuff.
What is your definition of doing just fine? Is a engine that lasts 150k miles just fine? What if someone else found the true life of that identical engie was 350k miles? One can argue that 100 years ago when people did not live as long they were doing just fine, and now people live in their 70's Is living to your 50's just fine? It was to them. I say every production engine should last for 300k miles.

Using just find does not fit, because I am fat and out of shape and I do just fine, but in reality I could do a LOT better.
 

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I have not figured out how to cut open my filters without causign a lot of particles from the cutting process to get into the filter.

When I removed the filter, I kept the contents of the filter in the filter after removign the magnet, therefore I am ready to test, but I have been trying to figure out how to not contaminate the inside by opening it. I have thought about a can opener, but have not tried it yet.

If I use a hack saw, I will get shavings in the inside and that will contaminate the test.

Ideas? Suggestions? I do have 3 filters from my Caliber ready.
 
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