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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just returned after picking up my Cali from the dealer for the first visit on a warranty issue. One of the things I wanted them to check out was the continual pulling to the right I was experiencing. I know that they usually don't do the best job of aligning a new vehicle at the plant, and with previous posts about pulling, I thought I'd take her in.

Well, anyway here is what happened. The dealer said that the tires were under inflated. They said that the tires should have between 40 and 42 psi in them because they are a larger tire. I have the convience group so I monitor my tires pretty carefully. I had about 30 in them all.

Anyway, on the way home, I reset the MPG calculator and mileage improved on the highway (about 30 miles to my house). I got about 37 MPG at 55-60 with cruise on. Not a bad improvement.

When home I did check the PSI recommended settings on the tag on the B pillar. It specifically said 32 psi. Now I'm really confused.

Comments? BTW, I have the stock tires on the car. Does anyone else know this recommendations of 40-42 PSI?
 

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i put a little air in mine the other day and noticed that. 44 max psi

my only concern, besides blowouts, is the amount of road noise. These crappy tires are really loud, and with more pressure, I'm sure it would only get worse.

However, anything to improve my crappy 21 MPG might be worth it.
 

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caprirs302 said:
You should go by what's on the tire itself, not the car. Look at the writing in rubber on the sidewall.
I would have to disagree with the above statement. The number on the tire is the maximum pressure the tire can handle. The recommended pressure per the manufacturer of the vehicle is the number listed on the door sticker, and is what should be followed. If the sticker is missing, follow the pressure recommendation listed in the owner's manual.

To protect your vehicle warranty, ALWAYS follow the PRINTED instructions provided by the manufacturer of the vehicle.

In this case, if the service department recommended a different inflation pressure than that stated by the sticker or the manual, ask them to PUT IN WRITING why they disagree with the manufacturer's recommendations - I guarantee they will back down immediately.
 

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I think it is also wise here to mention temperature variations and how they affect tire pressures. The sticker on the doorframe of my R/T says "Cold Tire Inflation Pressure" 35 psi front and rear for my stock 18s. When I have my tires correctly inflated to 35 psi when the tires are COMPLETELY cold (meaning they haven't been driven on in several hours) they quickly inflate to 39-40 psi after being driven on for a while. This I know by watching my tire pressure monitoring system. If the sidewall of your tires states max pressure 40 psi and you fill you tires to that pressure while cold or even slightly warm but not fully up to driving temperature, you're not only ignoring your vehicle's reccomendations but the tire manufacturer's as well.
 

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Here is what the good book says about this one:


STANDARD PROCEDURE
TIRE INFLATION PRESSURES




The specified tire pressures have been chosen to provide safe operation, vehicle stability, and a smooth ride. The proper tire pressure specification can be found on the Tire And Loading Information Label provided with the vehicle (usually on the driver’s door opening (B-pillar) or rear shutface of driver’s door).
A quality air pressure gauge is recommended to check tire air pressure. Tire pressure should be checked cold once per month. Check tire pressure more frequently when the weather temperature varies widely. Tire pressure will decrease when the outdoor temperature drops. After checking the air pressure, replace valve cap finger tight.
Inflation pressures specified on the Tire Inflation Pressure Label are always the cold inflation pressure of the tire.
Cold inflation pressure is obtained after the vehicle has not been operated for at least 3 hours, or the vehicle is driven less than one mile after being inoperative for 3 hours. Tire inflation pressures may increase from 2 to 6 pounds per square inch (psi) during operation. Do not reduce this normal pressure buildup.

Improper inflation can cause:



Uneven wear patterns

Reduced tread life
Reduced fuel economy
Unsatisfactory ride
The vehicle to drift.
 

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From CarCare.org
Proper tire inflation pressure is the specified air pressure given by a carmaker for a certain tire on a specific vehicle. This pressure specification should not be confused with a tire's maximum pressure, which is usually listed on the tire's sidewall. Some vehicles may specify different pressures for the front tires and the rear tires.

From NHTSA
Manufacturers of passenger vehicles and light trucks determine this number [PSI] based on the vehicle's design load limit, that is, the greatest amount of weight a vehicle can safely carry and the vehicle's tire size. The proper tire pressure for your vehicle is referred to as the "recommended cold inflation pressure." (As you will read below, it is difficult to obtain the recommended tire pressure if your tires are not cold.)

Because tires are designed to be used on more than one type of vehicle, tire manufacturers list the "maximum permissible inflation pressure" on the tire sidewall. This number is the greatest amount of air pressure that should ever be put in the tire under normal driving conditions.

From General Tires
Use the correct inflation pressure recommended by the vehicle manufacturer, not the pressure listed on the tire sidewall

More than half of drivers -- 55 percent -- incorrectly believe that the correct inflation pressure is printed on the tire sidewall.
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There you have it, use the tire pressure suggested by the manufaturer of the car, not what's printed on the tire itself.
 

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I got my tires (Conti Premiumcontact 2) replaced with all season tires (Pirelli Scorpion STR) after about 1200km and when I saw the mechanic searching for the correct tire pressure to apply, I remembered this thread and just yelled a "put some 2.8bar (42psi) in there - they say, thats about perfect for this car!"

He did and off I rode, with a Caliber that acted just like an old stagecoach on wooden wheels. There might be a difference between the european suspension and the north american suspension though, the european models (or at least the diesel) being somewhat stiffer maybe!?

After all, I've lowered the pressure to 2.3bar (33.5psi) and enjoy a ride as smooth as on my Contis before.

42psi really seems to be overdone in my eyes and may - as stated above - even contribute to a tire blow out during hot weather operation!
 
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