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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got an add in a recent order from Summit for this.
http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=SUM%2D01%2D06100&N=700+115&autoview=sku
Seems interesting, and almost worth the price. I have a few things i want to powdercoat, but don't have the "down time" required to take the parts to a shop. Figure I could do it myself at home and only have one day of downtime. I've looked at other home powder coating set ups that are cheaper, but they require more parts to make them work. This is all self contained. No need for a compressor(which I have) a water seperator, or a pressure regulator.
 

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I bought some stuff from the Eastwood Company a while back. Now they send me e-mails from time to time. I remember an interesting one with a deal on powder coating kits. Seemed interesting and there's a video and some tech tips in this link. All you need is an oven and a compressed air source. Might be worth while to check this one out too.

http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemID=16394&itemType=PRODUCT

Medic
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I've looked at that one before. I just think the one from Summit would be easier to use and clean up, plus I have a $15 discount code from Summit. Have you used the Eastwood kit, or did you buy other things from them.
 

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HSKR said:
Thanks. I've looked at that one before. I just think the one from Summit would be easier to use and clean up, plus I have a $15 discount code from Summit. Have you used the Eastwood kit, or did you buy other things from them.
Just bought tools from them. They have an extensive lineup of body tools. I almost bought one of their fender rollers a while back, then realized it would probably only get used once.

Medic
 

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Yeah, not sure how much I woudl use this powder coating thig after I get done what I want, but figure even just doing what I want done right now will save me money over taking the parts to a shop. Might not be the professional quality, but I'm not building a show truck.
 

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HSKR said:
Yeah, not sure how much I woudl use this powder coating thig after I get done what I want, but figure even just doing what I want done right now will save me money over taking the parts to a shop. Might not be the professional quality, but I'm not building a show truck.
If you get it, you can always do powder coating for friends and neighbors. Charge them less than the local shops and after a few jobs, you'll have earned the cost of the kit back. There's always people who want brake calipers powder coated.
 

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That's pretty cool, and cheap too. If I had a second oven, I'd be all over on myself.
 

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You are going to need to get another oven cause you have to cook the powercoat. If you do it in your regular oven you are going to taste it in your food. It will never go away. So just make sure you have an extra oven to cook the powder in!
 

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I've used the sandblaster that you got in the link before. Does a pretty good job IMHO....especially if it's only for a small job.

Now if you are going to go that route to clean parts prior to powdercoating there are some things that you have to take into concideration:

- Water seperator. Must have if in a humid area. If you don't use it the media will become soaked prior to meeting the surface, reducing the effectivness of the media to clean and open the "pours" of the metal. In the end you will use more media...and it's not cheap. Silica usually runs about $25 a bag depending on the grit....you can use crushed walnut shells glass / plastic beads but the cost is up there.

- Dust. Even a silica based media will kick up a hell of alot of dust. This will also include not only the dust from the media but also the paint and surface metal from the object you are stripping. There are health concerns here. Most media are alright for the do-it-yourselfer, however the paints and metal are concidered carcenogenic (read causing cancer) and will pose health problems if not immediatly but down the road. Masks are in order, with filters able to absorb 5 micron at the least.

- Protective gear. Along with masks, you will need face protection and hand protection. Media being pushed by even 90 psi will wreak havoc on your skin and will get into your eyes. Don't take a chance, on sliver of paint and your eye is gone.

- Hearing protection. Even if you are only planning on doing a small amount of work (less than an hour) your ears will be ringing. Get some ears plugs.

- Coveralls and a head cover. The media and paint will get into every nook and cranny of your body...need I say more? ;)

- Last but certainly not least.....clean up. Media blasting, while a great way to not only do a proper job of prepping a surface for powdercoating or painting, creats a mess. You have to do the correct thing and take certain precautions on disposing of the media due to the paint contamination. See your local sandblaster shop for details....I'm sure they will help you out, or at least point you to the HAZMAT department of your local municipality.

Just a bit of a background on my own experience...I was the team leader on many restoration projects in my Regiment. We restored to running condition a MK1 Ferret Scout car, restored 2 Mk1 Bren Gun Carriers and a 17 pounder Sherman to monument standards.

The Ferret took about 75 hours to blast properly, and in the early days we were hacking up a lung due to the media and the ****ty masks we used. A local who restores cars told us where we went wrong and got us sorted out. My lungs, body and wife owes him big time.

After the blasting was completed on each vehicle, a complete rub down with tack cloths and denatured alcohol had to be done in order to ensure a clean and grease free surface for the paints and powdercoat to adhere to. From there we used a self-etching primer for a good base coat for the paing to adhere to and the work went from there.

Hope that helps.

Regards


Here are a couple of pictures of the first days of sandblasting the Ferret before we were sorted out and the finnished product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Already planned on getting a sepereate oven for the powdercoating. And working for the Navy, I know all to well about proper PPE(personal protective equiptment) for doing both the sand blasting and powdercoating.

I purchased the sand blaster I asked about earlier, but found a cheaper price online through yahoo shopping. $45 shipped. And also bought some blasting media to use. Non-silicate type stuff. $15 shipped for 10lbs. Hope that will last for what I want it for.

I'm also purchasing the Powdercoating kit I asked about in the beginning of this thread. Well, almost the same one. hehe Craftsman now sells a re-badged WAI unit under the Carftsman name. What this means is I can buy it using my Sears card, buy the Sears extended warranty, and be able to take it into Sears for repair or replacement should something go wrong. Plus, it's on sale at Sears through Sept 2nd for the same price as the WAI kit at Summitracing. The cheapest I've found the WAI kit listed for is $139. And to me, it's worth it to pay the extra $20 to buy it from Sears and have a store I can actually take it back to should something go wrong as opposed to buying online and having to ship it somewhere for warranty.
 
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