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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i've noticed on my caliber that if you lean on the door from the outside, it bends inwards and bows and makes like a click/pop noise. like if i put enough pressure on this door it feels like it will make a somewhat perminant indent. how about the hood of the car,? I used to be able to sit on the hood of my '91 camry fine. i get the feeling i'd almost break through the hood of the car or make a horribly ugly dent. anyone think otherwise? i just feel like the car is too plasticy and delicate.
 

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Its really never a good idea to sit on a hood. It doesnt matter how much bracing it has its still resting on the stops and in some cases even the latch will be taking your weight. The doors i would guess can take some significant pressure before you actually stretch the skin enough to make a dent. I wouldnt test it though.
 

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I don't believe any manufacturer intends that you sit on the hood. I also don't think the flexibility of the metal is any indication of the quality of the vehicle.
 

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With todays crumple zones and whatnots, I'm not slightly surprised that it seems a bit thin. If you think about it, it was purposely designed that way.
 

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Thin sheet metal is common on all modern cars. Gone are the days when you could party on the hood:) This is another weight saving as well as material saving design decision.

A service tech with a severe brain cramp dented my hood while closing it by pushing down instead of dropping. All was made right but this illustrates the thinness of the metal. The hood is very light if you check it out.
 

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Anyone ever sits on my hood i'm gonna beat their a**. BTW don't lean on your door so hard next time.
 

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I work in an automotive manufacturing plant. I see the various rolls of steel, the body parts, and the finnished body. The governemnt makes laws to cause force the car makers to increase gas milage. One way this is done is by making the car lighter. They use as thin and light as possible of steel everywhere they can get buy with, BUT in ALL of the critical locations they use thick heavy duty steel. In the outside cosmetic parts it is thin easly dented steel which you can bend by pushing on it. I tried the same thing on structure parts of the unibody frame parts, and I hurt my hand. The steal did not give any, but my hand hurt. It is like the Saturn's "Dent resistant pannels" which are PLASTIC. They break, but are light.
Unfortunatly if they used heavy steel everywhere the car would be heaver and thus get worse milage. They use crumple zones, and re-inforcement bars everywhere possible to make the car safe, and everywhere else it is as thin as possible to keep the weight down. The ideal car is made out of mostly carbon fiber. Stronger than steel, and ultra light. The problem with carbon fiber is the excessive cost.

Try your test on any other 2007 car, your results will be about the same.
 

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I just wish the front and rear bumper vinyl covering was attached to the car a little more firmly. It feels like it would tear off going over a snowdrift. It seems most new cars now have this flimsy covering. You see the expressways littered with them after minor fender-benders.
 
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