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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With as little fanfare as possible, Chrysler has launched the new Sebring, which is built on the Caliber chassis. The Sebring uses two of the same 2.0L and 2.4L World four cylinder engines found in the Caliber amongst it's NA and European markets. However the North American Sebring also got a refreshed 2.7L and 3.5L V6 option.

Imagine, if you will, your Caliber with 250 BHP and 250 ft-lbs of torque and you need not wait in line for the seemingly further delayed SRT.

Also consider how many other Caliber parts ended up in the Sebring and it makes one really wonder if a 13 year old with an engine hoist and set of hand tools could do this engine swap, let alone some people with more tech savvy.

For those concerned with fuel mileage, EPA estimates place the 3.5L Sebring at 19/28.

I know what is on my plate when it comes to the end of the lease and we make a decision to keep or ditch the Caliber.
 

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CoolCallie said:
With as little fanfare as possible, Chrysler has launched the new Sebring, which is built on the Caliber chassis. The Sebring uses two of the same 2.0L and 2.4L World four cylinder engines found in the Caliber amongst it's NA and European markets. However the North American Sebring also got a refreshed 2.7L and 3.5L V6 option.

Imagine, if you will, your Caliber with 250 BHP and 250 ft-lbs of torque and you need not wait in line for the seemingly further delayed SRT.

Also consider how many other Caliber parts ended up in the Sebring and it makes one really wonder if a 13 year old with an engine hoist and set of hand tools could do this engine swap, let alone some people with more tech savvy.

For those concerned with fuel mileage, EPA estimates place the 3.5L Sebring at 19/28.

I know what is on my plate when it comes to the end of the lease and we make a decision to keep or ditch the Caliber.
Where does it say "futher delayed SRT4"? I personally don't think the added weight would be worth it... the VR6 Golf vs. the 1.8L GTI for example, the GTI is quicker despite being less powerful
 

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not if you could put twin turbo's on it. heck i bet even the stock block could handle 4-6 psi with no issues and make a ton of hp. more than the stock srt caliber will... and i cannot see it weighing that much more. plus the vw's that you quoted with very few mods are making alot of hp. sooooo i guess it could half a dozen ...u get the idea.
 

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boostdog said:
not if you could put twin turbo's on it. heck i bet even the stock block could handle 4-6 psi with no issues and make a ton of hp. more than the stock srt caliber will... and i cannot see it weighing that much more. plus the vw's that you quoted with very few mods are making alot of hp. sooooo i guess it could half a dozen ...u get the idea.
The core of the ’07 Caliber SRT4, like its predecessor, is a 2.4-liter turbocharged and intercooled four, transversely mounted and driving the front wheels. But that’s where the likeness ends. The hurry-up Caliber is driven by a boosted version of an all-new, all-aluminum DOHC 16-valve four (the previous engine had an iron block), developed as a joint venture among DaimlerChrysler, Hyundai, and Mitsubishi, called GEMA, for Global Engine Manufacturing Alliance. It has a production facility in Dundee, Michigan, and the initial DaimlerChrysler yield is a three-engine family — 1.8, 2.0, and 2.4 liters.

The biggest of the trio was the obvious starting point for this exercise, and according to Pete Gladysz, senior manager for SRT powertrains, adapting the GEMA engine for high output didn’t require any really dramatic departures from the stock engine’s basic components. There are new Mahle pistons, designed for a lower stock compression ratio (8.6:1 versus 10.5:1), forged steel connecting rods, valves designed for higher operating temps, heftier bottom-end bearings, oil squirters to keep the con rods and pistons cool, and an external oil cooler.

“The basic engine was designed with this kind of application in mind,” says Gladysz. “There wasn’t any point in doing anything with the cams, because with a turbo you don’t want really long cam events.

“Of course, the electronic scheme of the variable valve timing is much different from the production version, but that’s easy to handle with programming.”

And, of course, with boost.

With a slightly larger bore (88mm versus 87.5) and shorter stroke (97mm versus 101) compared with the old SRT4 engine, the new mill revs higher (a 6000-rpm power peak compared with 5300), but it’s the Garrett TD04 turbo that really makes the dyno spin. Air finds its way into the system via a Valeo air-to-air intercooler (about 50 percent bigger than the previous intercooler, according to Gladysz) and stock intake manifold. The fuel pump delivers higher flow, and there are bigger injectors delivering the combustibles.
The SRT4’s ECU, developed by Siemens, is a sophisticated piece of computer technology, and it governs boost and engine output over a broad range of operating parameters. But under ideal conditions, the turbo produces max boost of 16 psi, and with everything in optimum the new engine will churn 300 horsepower at 6000 rpm and 260 pound-feet of torque across an unusually broad range, from 2000 on to the horsepower peak. As with the previous SRT4, this adds up to a pretty seductive bang-for-buck story, only more so.

The turbo motor sends thrust to the front wheels via a new six-speed manual gearbox, a Getrag-Ford unit, and a Torsen II limited-slip diff. Aside from six speeds — the previous SRT4 tranny had only five — the most appealing traits of this new gearbox (which uses a shift mechanism from the manual trans used in the European diesel version of the Caliber)
Lets compare the costs of taking a regular caliber, buying the v6 engine and fabricating the installation. The ECU isn't just plug and play. Forget the weight, the V6 wasn't designed with an FI application in mind whereas the Caliber SRT4 was... a qucik glance at the highlights above and one can appreciate the changes required to support an FI setup.

So now you've paid for the Caliber, the Engine, the fabrication (voiding any remaining warranty that might have had left on your Caliber) bumped up the curb weight and paid someone to wire it up so that it actually runs (lets not even go into the suspension/drivetrain which wasn't designed for that kind of power).

Now you are going to go and fabricate a custom one off turbo for an engine/drivetrain package that wasn't meant for it.... i think you will have spent nearly twice the cost of a new Caliber SRT4 (given you had to purhcase your Caliber in the first place) which would have that wonderfull new car warranty, and come with the engine internals, drivetrain and suspension ready to go for a performance application right out of the gate. There are plenty of 400 + whp Neon SRT4's rolling around on stock internals for less money.

So while creative, its not a smart idea
 

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in question was not how much it would cost but if and how it could be done ( and yes we all know with any amount of $ anything can be done ) but to have something different and to buy a used v6 and push 6 psi through it would not be that much.....i have a buddy with a full fab shop...soo it pays to know people, but if it came down to price ya there is no way that it would be cost effective, but could be done without paying the price for 2 calibers. i am also wondering how well the alum. block will stand up to abuse like the iron block in the 03-05 models.

BUt think about it how cool it would be to have a full drag rwd caliber v6 twin turbo...not that would be sweet!
 

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I never understand why people always question the strength of aluminum. It is only SLIGHTLY weaker than STEEL, and we all know that steel is stronger than iron. The ONLY concern with aluminum is overheating, and with modern machines that is not nearly as much of an issue as it was say back in the 1970's when aluminum was some kind of wizbang new idea.
 

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boostdog said:
in question was not how much it would cost but if and how it could be done ( and yes we all know with any amount of $ anything can be done ) but to have something different and to buy a used v6 and push 6 psi through it would not be that much.....i have a buddy with a full fab shop...soo it pays to know people, but if it came down to price ya there is no way that it would be cost effective, but could be done without paying the price for 2 calibers. i am also wondering how well the alum. block will stand up to abuse like the iron block in the 03-05 models.

BUt think about it how cool it would be to have a full drag rwd caliber v6 twin turbo...not that would be sweet!
Ok are we talking about cool or a realistic good idea? I don't disagree with cool, but in reality you will be much, much, much better off just getting the srt4 as it has been designed in and out for that kind of application
 

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looking at my engine compartment I just dont think there is room enough for a bigger engine. Although gotta admit a V6 would sound pretty sweet with a dual exhaust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Unoriginalusername said:
Lets compare the costs of taking a regular caliber, buying the v6 engine and fabricating the installation. The ECU isn't just plug and play. Forget the weight, the V6 wasn't designed with an FI application in mind whereas the Caliber SRT4 was... a qucik glance at the highlights above and one can appreciate the changes required to support an FI setup.
Was a little 3.0L V6 with some 10.0:1 compression ratio found in a four door family sedan designed for boost? Some would think not, but Noble thought it was the perfect engine for their kit cars and put twin turbos on it. The only thing forged in the 3.0L is the crankshaft. Kit cars and big names aside, a good friend of mine is running twin turbos safely on his same 3.0L Duratec-powered Mazda6, no low compression pistons, no forged pistons or connecting rods. All of the internals are factory. TUNING is the only change required for a forced induction setup, you can run as much compression as you want, as long as you adjust timing and A/F ratios appropriately across the entire RPM band.

Unoriginalusername said:
So now you've paid for the Caliber, the Engine, the fabrication (voiding any remaining warranty that might have had left on your Caliber) bumped up the curb weight and paid someone to wire it up so that it actually runs (lets not even go into the suspension/drivetrain which wasn't designed for that kind of power).
Voiding what warranty? Not familiar with federal law passed back in the 1970s probably before either of us was born? Magnusson-Moss Warranty Act lays it out clean and simple, a manufacturer can only deny a warranty repair if an aftermarket part was the cause of the failure of the factory part. There are so many warranties a new car carries beyond the engine. If by me putting a 3.5L V6 in the Caliber breaks something else, I am no dumbass or mouch, I'll fix it my damn self or pay for it.

You don't know what any part is capable of until you break it, no one has broken a Ford Duratec connecting rod under too much power and they have seen power levels over twice factory output. So you can't go off and say that a vehicle was not designed for any kind of extra performance output, because then you void that statement in your very next paragraph with 400+ BHP Neons.

A 3.5L out of a Pacifica, WITH WARRANTY, and only 12,000 miles on the engine only costs me $900 and it comes with everything sans the ECU.
 

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CoolCallie said:
Was a little 3.0L V6 with some 10.0:1 compression ratio found in a four door family sedan designed for boost? Some would think not, but Noble thought it was the perfect engine for their kit cars and put twin turbos on it. The only thing forged in the 3.0L is the crankshaft. Kit cars and big names aside, a good friend of mine is running twin turbos safely on his same 3.0L Duratec-powered Mazda6, no low compression pistons, no forged pistons or connecting rods. All of the internals are factory. TUNING is the only change required for a forced induction setup, you can run as much compression as you want, as long as you adjust timing and A/F ratios appropriately across the entire RPM band.



Voiding what warranty? Not familiar with federal law passed back in the 1970s probably before either of us was born? Magnusson-Moss Warranty Act lays it out clean and simple, a manufacturer can only deny a warranty repair if an aftermarket part was the cause of the failure of the factory part. There are so many warranties a new car carries beyond the engine. If by me putting a 3.5L V6 in the Caliber breaks something else, I am no dumbass or mouch, I'll fix it my damn self or pay for it.

You don't know what any part is capable of until you break it, no one has broken a Ford Duratec connecting rod under too much power and they have seen power levels over twice factory output. So you can't go off and say that a vehicle was not designed for any kind of extra performance output, because then you void that statement in your very next paragraph with 400+ BHP Neons.

A 3.5L out of a Pacifica, WITH WARRANTY, and only 12,000 miles on the engine only costs me $900 and it comes with everything sans the ECU.
Lol i will bet you a steak dinner that if you put a V6 in your caliber and then have a tranny problem that you will not get warranty work done since they will claim the increased output caused the problem.
 

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Unoriginalusername said:
Lol i will bet you a steak dinner that if you put a V6 in your caliber and then have a tranny problem that you will not get warranty work done since they will claim the increased output caused the problem.
I will bet if you put a V-6 in a Caliber, you will have to replace the tranny anyways, because the CVT won't bolt up to the V-6 and still fit, so thats kinda of a moot point. And you will probably end up just putting a whole new front drivetrain in, motor, transaxle,...., if you are keeping it FWD. If going RWD, there will be a LOT more modification that will need to be done to the undercarraige of the Cali to make it work with a driveshaft and a rear differential. Also, anyone going to that much work really doesn't care about warranty at that point anyways.
 

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V6 would be nice, smoother power. Why dont they make a 2.0L V6? good milage and smothe power? Add that to the CVT
 

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Better yet since Dodge has a deal with VW for the diesel engine make a deal for their 2.5L 5 cylinder engine. That engine has really nice power.
 

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AWD caliber is fairly set for RWD. You would have some alignment issues and some pinion angle issues but it can definetly be done. Would take a tiny tranny to replace the CVT and transfercase with though. If you have a peek at the transfercase on the R/T its TINY!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If we do end up keeping it, the 3.5 would be mated to it's natural counterpart, the Chrysler 6-spd automatic with AutoStick. Never been a stick shift man myself, driven many, never found the appeal, the "joy" of shifting and clutching in rush hour traffic at 5 MPH.

Who said the ECU couldn't be plug-n-play? If the ECU matches the engine and transaxle combo and the instrument cluster is a direct carry-over from the Caliber with some aluminum inserts surrounding the gauge needles being the only difference. What isn't plug-n-play?
 

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The dash harness and such may be fun. But thats something a person willing to do the swap surely can handle. I personally would rather see a v8 stuffed into one. A nice hemi jammed into a caliber would be ....... excuse me
 

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CoolCallie said:
Who said the ECU couldn't be plug-n-play? If the ECU matches the engine and transaxle combo and the instrument cluster is a direct carry-over from the Caliber with some aluminum inserts surrounding the gauge needles being the only difference. What isn't plug-n-play?
How bout the fact that the ECU is programed for the sensors and motor on each vehicle. Plus add in the fact that the wireing harness in the Caliber isn't designed for a V-6 of any type. So sure, the ECU will be plug and play as long as you swap the whole engine wiring harness at the same time.
 

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It would be a very unique Caliber if you can do it. It sure does need the power... Im just hoping for a Supercharger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
HSKR said:
How bout the fact that the ECU is programed for the sensors and motor on each vehicle. Plus add in the fact that the wireing harness in the Caliber isn't designed for a V-6 of any type. So sure, the ECU will be plug and play as long as you swap the whole engine wiring harness at the same time.
Dexactly what I said. Motor, transaxle, harness and ECU would all come from the same vehicle. The only differences would be the possibility of the ABS wheel speed sensors and something in the dash being different but the latter is unlikely as the entire interior is Caliber in the Sebring.
 
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