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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am already likeing my AWD R/T and after reading so much on here. now am wondering how much horsepower each mod will do to the R/T's 174 stock HP.

If you did say the Cold Air Intake and if they come out with a Chip Upgrade could those two alone get you to 200HP, if so that would be pretty cool and do the people in the know think this engine / CVT combo is strong enough to handle these power upgrades?

One last thing, Does the exhaust upgrade make it sound better, Be cool if it had a little bit of a growl to it.

Flaps
 

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I doubt the CAI and ECU refalsh alone will get you to 200. The headers, CAI, and C/B exhaust together supposedly make 10 hp. Of course DCx usually understate their performance claims but I dunno..:D
 

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I think they must really understate the numbers. I checked k&n filter web site and they say you might gain 8 to 16 hp on average. that's with just the filter, I would hope with the more expensive bolt ons like cat back exhaust, computer chip, throtle bodies, and so on you would crack well over 200 hp. When ever the parts might be available. :rolleyes:
 

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I still think the most bang-for-buck mods are suspension mods. Yeah, you don't get more hp - you just get a much more fun car to drive. The customer that they cater towards demand a smooshy ride - even on sporty models. Anyone who will compromise the comfort of their spine and kidneys can get a serious improvement in the suspension arena.

If you want to make your car just feel that much more agressive, fun, zippy, whatever - a revamped suspension with great feedback (stiffer springs, shocks, bushings, etc) will make your car more fun to drive. A loud exhaust and intake may make you think you're getting flashier throttle response or a serious cut in your 1/4 mile time - but really - you can add 100 hp and only shave 0.8 seconds off a 1/4 time.

Look at the "500 kit" from Hennessey for the SRT8s. You spend almost $10,000 add about 75 hp and shave 0.7 seconds off a 1/4 mile. Counter that with a scenario where you spend $2,000 for extra suspension stiffness... and spend another $1000 on roll bars. Your modded SRT8 will definitely feel more more sporty and you'll have much more fun driving the car (aside from just a straight line).
 

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True that. Never really thought about suspension.


But the most bang for the buck regarding the drivetrain is always forced induction. Turbos are usually cheaper too..:D
 

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caliber4whoosh said:
True that. Never really thought about suspension.


But the most bang for the buck regarding the drivetrain is always forced induction. Turbos are usually cheaper too..:D
Yeah a turbo would do, but for some reason I like the sounds of a built N/A engine.
 

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Yeah the sound of a N/A engine may sound good on a 300+ horsepower SRT, but in a small compact a turbo sounds awesome.

If the price is right, I could easily add a turbo to my Caliber once I get it. Hopefully the result would be a car that can pickup closer to what would be expected from an R/T.

EDIT: Also, has anyone found a good source of aftermarket parts that also lists the gains in hp and/or torque? Thanks.
 

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Once again, forced induction, but a properly sized turbo would be more efficient on an engine of this size.
Superchargers are parasitic, their belts suck power from the engine and then produce that and then some. On V-8's they work great, on a 2.0 or 2.4 liter I-4, not so much. About 40-50% increase.

Turbo's, on the other hand, run off of the exhaust gases, so they don't suck power from the engine, instead making use of the engine's byproduct. Turbo's net about a 60-70% increase.
 

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Any word on a tubro setup yet for the Calibers?
 

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caliber4whoosh said:
Once again, forced induction, but a properly sized turbo would be more efficient on an engine of this size.
Superchargers are parasitic, their belts suck power from the engine and then produce that and then some. On V-8's they work great, on a 2.0 or 2.4 liter I-4, not so much. About 40-50% increase.

Turbo's, on the other hand, run off of the exhaust gases, so they don't suck power from the engine, instead making use of the engine's byproduct. Turbo's net about a 60-70% increase.
Yes and no. A turbo takes time to spool and creates more backpressure. So supercharger is what you want if you want more power lower as the SC is always spinning and ready to boost. Turbo might make more total high end HP, but you can't beat a supercharger for immediate power and better torque. Not to mention that WICKED supercharger whine. I love that.
 

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The only thing I don't like/ am weary about when a car has a turbo is that there is that much more room for leaks. Leaks being, oil or air. I just like the idea of building the internals for power, may [will] not get the same results with that same amount of money, but that is JUST ME.

Don't get me worng I am going to love the SRT-4 Caliber...
 

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I don't think you can abstract a turbo to being just a single mod. While your engine gets more powerful - most stock cars aren't built to handle that type of power. The people that successfully run turbo applications on cars that are not turbocharged from the factory have to spend a lot of time tuning their motors.

Not only do you have to get the right air-fuel mixtures across the board, but you also have to do routine teardowns of the motor to make sure you're not running with damaged pistons, heads, etc. It's not just a plug and play affair you can do and then sort of forget about. To put it another way, the compression ratio of a Stock Caliber SRT4 is supposed to be 8.6:1. The Compression ratio of a 2.4L RT is 10.5:1. You can't just slap a turbo on the RT motor and expect good things on normal fuel (like stuff below 93 octane). This is ignoring the stresses to the rest of your drivetrain.

I wouldn't mess with a turbo or supercharger unless you have the knowhow to keep the car running well. A turbo isn't a new exhaust or intake - you cannot just 'set it and forget it.'
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What does the Catback do? Just add sound or HP as well, it is a simple direct bolt on? Flaps
 

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holeydonut said:
I don't think you can abstract a turbo to being just a single mod. While your engine gets more powerful - most stock cars aren't built to handle that type of power. The people that successfully run turbo applications on cars that are not turbocharged from the factory have to spend a lot of time tuning their motors.

Not only do you have to get the right air-fuel mixtures across the board, but you also have to do routine teardowns of the motor to make sure you're not running with damaged pistons, heads, etc. It's not just a plug and play affair you can do and then sort of forget about. To put it another way, the compression ratio of a Stock Caliber SRT4 is supposed to be 8.6:1. The Compression ratio of a 2.4L RT is 10.5:1. You can't just slap a turbo on the RT motor and expect good things on normal fuel (like stuff below 93 octane). This is ignoring the stresses to the rest of your drivetrain.

I wouldn't mess with a turbo or supercharger unless you have the knowhow to keep the car running well. A turbo isn't a new exhaust or intake - you cannot just 'set it and forget it.'
I never said that it was. I merely stated that it was the most "bang for the buck." Never that it was simple..;)
 

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holeydonut said:
I don't think you can abstract a turbo to being just a single mod. While your engine gets more powerful - most stock cars aren't built to handle that type of power. The people that successfully run turbo applications on cars that are not turbocharged from the factory have to spend a lot of time tuning their motors.

Not only do you have to get the right air-fuel mixtures across the board, but you also have to do routine teardowns of the motor to make sure you're not running with damaged pistons, heads, etc. It's not just a plug and play affair you can do and then sort of forget about. To put it another way, the compression ratio of a Stock Caliber SRT4 is supposed to be 8.6:1. The Compression ratio of a 2.4L RT is 10.5:1. You can't just slap a turbo on the RT motor and expect good things on normal fuel (like stuff below 93 octane). This is ignoring the stresses to the rest of your drivetrain.

I wouldn't mess with a turbo or supercharger unless you have the knowhow to keep the car running well. A turbo isn't a new exhaust or intake - you cannot just 'set it and forget it.'
you know...it still wont stop the "kids" from blowing up their engine...common sense is something of a rare commodity in our society...
 

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True that..

Obituary of Common Sense !
Today, we mourn the passing of an old friend by the name of Common Sense.
Common Sense lived a long life, but died from heart failure at the brink of the Millennium. No one really knows how old he was since his birth records were long ago lost in bureaucratic red tape. He selflessly devoted his life to service in schools; hospitals, homes, factories and offices, helping folks get jobs done without fanfare and foolishness.For decades, petty rules, silly laws and frivolous lawsuits held no power over Common Sense. He was credited with cultivating such valued lessons as to know when to come in from rain, the early bird gets the worm and life isn't always fair.
Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don't spend more than you earn), reliable parenting strategies (the adults are in charge, not the kids), and it's okay to come in second. A veteran of the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, and the Technological Revolution, Common Sense survived cultural and educational trends including feminism, body piercing, whole language and new math. But his health declined when he became infected with the "if-it-only-helps-one-person-it's-worth-it" virus. In recent decades, his waning strength proved no match for the ravages of overbearing federal legislation.
He watched in pain as good people became ruled by self-seeking lawyers and enlightened auditors. His health rapidly deteriorated when schools endlessly implemented zero tolerance policies; when reports were heard of six year old boys charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; when a teen was suspended for taking a swig of mouthwash after lunch; when a teacher was fired for reprimanding an unruly student. It declined even further when schools had to get parental consent to administer aspirin to a student but couldn't inform the parent when a female student is pregnant or wants an abortion.
Finally, Common Sense lost his will to live as the Ten Commandments became contraband, churches became businesses, criminals received better treatment than victims, and federal judges stuck their noses in everything from Boy Scouts to professional sports.
As the end neared, Common Sense drifted in and out of logic but was kept informed of developments, regarding questionable regulations for asbestos, low-flow toilets, smart guns, the nurturing of Prohibition Laws and mandatory air bags.
Finally, when told that the homeowners association restricted exterior furniture only to that which enhanced property values, he breathed his last.
Common Sense was preceded in death by his parents Truth and Trust; his wife, Discretion; his daughter, Responsibility; and his son Reason. His three stepbrothers survive him: Rights, Tolerance and Whiner.
Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone.
 

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caliber4whoosh said:
True that..

Obituary of Common Sense !
Today, we mourn the passing of an old friend by the name of Common Sense.
Common Sense lived a long life, but died from heart failure at the brink of the Millennium. No one really knows how old he was since his birth records were long ago lost in bureaucratic red tape. He selflessly devoted his life to service in schools; hospitals, homes, factories and offices, helping folks get jobs done without fanfare and foolishness.For decades, petty rules, silly laws and frivolous lawsuits held no power over Common Sense. He was credited with cultivating such valued lessons as to know when to come in from rain, the early bird gets the worm and life isn't always fair.
Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don't spend more than you earn), reliable parenting strategies (the adults are in charge, not the kids), and it's okay to come in second. A veteran of the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, and the Technological Revolution, Common Sense survived cultural and educational trends including feminism, body piercing, whole language and new math. But his health declined when he became infected with the "if-it-only-helps-one-person-it's-worth-it" virus. In recent decades, his waning strength proved no match for the ravages of overbearing federal legislation.
He watched in pain as good people became ruled by self-seeking lawyers and enlightened auditors. His health rapidly deteriorated when schools endlessly implemented zero tolerance policies; when reports were heard of six year old boys charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; when a teen was suspended for taking a swig of mouthwash after lunch; when a teacher was fired for reprimanding an unruly student. It declined even further when schools had to get parental consent to administer aspirin to a student but couldn't inform the parent when a female student is pregnant or wants an abortion.
Finally, Common Sense lost his will to live as the Ten Commandments became contraband, churches became businesses, criminals received better treatment than victims, and federal judges stuck their noses in everything from Boy Scouts to professional sports.
As the end neared, Common Sense drifted in and out of logic but was kept informed of developments, regarding questionable regulations for asbestos, low-flow toilets, smart guns, the nurturing of Prohibition Laws and mandatory air bags.
Finally, when told that the homeowners association restricted exterior furniture only to that which enhanced property values, he breathed his last.
Common Sense was preceded in death by his parents Truth and Trust; his wife, Discretion; his daughter, Responsibility; and his son Reason. His three stepbrothers survive him: Rights, Tolerance and Whiner.
Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone.
Sinan, that HAS to be your longest post ever!!!:D:D:D (Eventhough you just copied and pasted it will go in the record as that):eek:
 

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That's nice Joe....
 
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